Feast reaches school food education program

Kitchen-Garden-Program-students-CREDIT-MARCEL-AUCAR

Feast reaches school food education program

The reach of SBS Feast magazine extends beyond the everyday consumer, as we discovered when Bev Laing from the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation contacted us recently. Bev is the Curriculum Officer at the Kitchen Garden Foundation, which develops teaching resources used in the over 700 schools in the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program. She let us know how she incorporates the magazine into teaching children the importance of understanding different cultures.

Kitchen Garden Program students (1)

Students of the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program learn how to make pasta from scratch.

 

“The Program’s curriculum units focus on cultural cuisines, on ‘cooking your way around the world’ through tracing ingredients or flavours, learning geography, languages and enjoying diversity along the way.”

 

The Kitchen Garden Foundation– a not-for-profit organisation – aims to educate primary school-aged children on the benefits of home-grown vegetables, fruits and herbs, as well as expanding their knowledge of cooking and food from various cultures. This is where schools find Feast to be a useful resource. The hundreds of participating schools use a hands-on method of instruction, allowing children the opportunity to get their hands dirty in the garden and in the kitchen but also extends this knowledge to the classroom, where recipe literacy is emphasised.

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Students are taught how to properly season meals.

 

Bev recommends Feast as a classroom tool for teachers to demonstrate the litany of ingredients and traditions of cooking across the globe. “I’ve raved to teachers in training classes about your ‘One Ingredient’ series,” says Bev, “and for literacy students make up menus for story book characters, puns and songs,” in a way similar to the writing style at Feast.

Kitchen Garden Program students (2)

Students learn how to grow their own fruits and vegetables from scratch.

 

With a readership of over 200 000, Feast is proud to be a source of inspiration for readers, whether it be in expanding the recipe selection of the household cook, or opening readers’ eyes to different celebratory customs. The Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Program is a prestigious and necessary effort, helping children learn the origin and importance of wholefoods. Feast is delighted to be used as a learning tool, an example of one of the many ways that the magazine extends beyond a mere recipe book for the everyday magazine-reader.